Tag Photography

Holy Monastery of Simonos Petra, Mt. Athos, Greece

A 13th-century Orthodox monastery at twilight. I like how, lit on its craggy outcrop, it signals both precariousness and home. I also like the orange plastic debris chute attached to the corner scaffolding.

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Originally published at culture-making.com.

Sorting olives

I wish I knew more about the olive-sorting process. Perhaps the dried-out ones drift away? Or is she just rearranging the bowl’s contents so she can do a visual inspection once things have settled?

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Originally published at culture-making.com.

Stone wall, Cuzco, Peru

I’m familiar (but none the less amazed) with the look of Cuzco’s famous mortarless Incan masonry (talk about a well-disciplined cultural offering!), the seams between the blocks at once organic and artificial. But whenever I see another image like this, I wonder what the seams look like on the inside—do the joints just go straight back? Do things get even more complex?

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the wall,” by flickr user lo747, 13 March 2008 :: via Intelligent Travel Flickr Pool

Originally published at culture-making.com.

Correct method to raise a soldier

From the New York Public Library’s Digital Gallery, which has over 600,000 images from the NYPL’s collections. I was searching around with keywords like gesture and posture, and found this: “Three soldiers carry a fourth to demonstrate one stage of the correct method to raise a soldier from a reclining position for carrying.” It’s clearly not so easy to hoist a comrade and then hold absolutely still for the many seconds necessary to make an 1860s photo.

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Lifting a wounded or sick soldier,” photographer unknown, from United States Sanitary Commission records (1861-1865), NYPL Digital Gallery :: via Hoefler & Frere-Jones

Originally published at culture-making.com.

Super Kingdom by London Fieldworks

From a series of site-specific “show homes” inspired by the hibernation patterns of local animals. “Amazing birdhouses” doesn’t quite seem to capture it all, but I think it might be roughly accurate. For me the symbolic resonances that jumped out from this particular image were: the Tower of Babel and Noah’s Ark—or, come to think of it—a cross between the Garden of Eden and the New Jerusalem.

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from “Super Kingdom,” by London Fieldworks (Bruce Gilchrist and Jo Joelson), opened 21 September 2008 at Stour Valley Arts in Kent, England :: via designboom

Originally published at culture-making.com.

Riyadh, Saudi Arabia by Shawn Baldwin

From Shawn Baldwin’s caption: “Young Saudi men shop for mobile phones at a store in Riyadh. For many young Saudi men and women, who have few chances to meet members of the opposite sex, mobile phones and Bluetooth technology allow them the ability to safely flirt in malls, restaurants and traffic signals. The photograph was taken as part of a series I’m working on for the New York Times called ‘Generation Faithful’. The series examines the lives of young people across the Muslim world at a time of religious revival.”

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“Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. 2008”, from the photo series “Genration Faithful,” by Shawn Baldwin :: via Verve Photo: The New Generation of Documentary Photographers, 19 September, 2008

Originally published at culture-making.com.

Water bottle sandals, by Kinzénguélé

I’m not even sure what continent this record of heartbreaking ingenuity reaches us from. It shows a variant on the more common repurposed footwear of the developing world, the car tire sandal. Presumably these are less durable and comfortable—though perhaps on hot sand the bottles offer better insulation than rubber would.

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Water bottle sandals, photo by Kinzénguélé, from the exhibition L’art … en eaux troubles, at the School Gallery in Paris, March 2008 :: via FFFFOUND!/ReubenMiller

Originally published at culture-making.com.

First Congregational Church, Weeping Water, Nebraska

I was struck by the rust streaking on this church in the evocatively named Weeping Water, NE (pop. 1003). The church seemed to be weeping too! At first I thought it must be derelict, but I think the staining is a sort of natural patina that grows from flecks of iron in the limestone—the Weeping Water Public Library has the same facade, also out of stone from the town quarry, which is listed as the largest limestone mine in the state.


First Congregational Church, Weeping Water, Nebraska, Google Street View

Originally published at culture-making.com.

Flying, by Joseph Brunjes

I love the combination of this kid’s gesture of abandon and look of rapt concentration. Serious fun indeed.

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Flying,” photo by Joseph Brunjes, FILE Magazine, September 2008

Originally published at culture-making.com.

Ganesh CD player, Mumbai, India

What’s it called when you find something offensive on behalf of another religion (even though you realize said religion might not, if you can speak of it generally, take as much offense)? Well however misplaced my empathy may be, here you go: a CD player topped with a cyclopian plastic image of Mumbai’s favorite god of prosperity, Ganesh, which the photographer found in the city’s renowned hipster/high-fashion boutique Bombay Electric. I can’t stop thinking of the line from Gita Mehta’s wonderful book Karma Cola: Marketing the Mythic East, about how you should never trust a guru who wears running shoes.

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Ganesh CD player, from a Mumbai photo gallery by Michael Rubenstein, National Geographic Traveler, October 2008 :: via Neatorama

Originally published at culture-making.com.